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International Criminal Law and Justice

International criminal law and justice is a legal system that holds individuals and groups accountable for serious crimes committed on a global scale. These crimes include genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and crimes of aggression. International criminal law is governed by a number of international treaties, including the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), which established the ICC as the first permanent international criminal court. The ICC has the power to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and crimes of aggression committed on or after July 1, 2002. International criminal justice is implemented through a variety of mechanisms, including international criminal tribunals, ad-hoc tribunals, and national courts. Examples of these mechanisms include the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), which were established to prosecute individuals for war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide committed during the Yugoslav Wars and the Rwandan genocide, respectively. The ICC and other international criminal tribunals have the authority to prosecute individuals for the most serious international crimes, such as genocide and crimes against humanity. However, it is important to note that the ICC is a court of last resort, meaning that it will only step in if a country is unwilling or unable to prosecute the crimes committed on its territory. International criminal justice also includes reparations for victims and the restoration of dignity and respect for survivors, as well as the promotion of peaceful coexistence and reconciliation among communities. In addition, there are also International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Rwanda (ICTR), and the International Criminal Court for Sierra Leone (ICC-Sierra Leone) which were established by the United Nations to prosecute individuals for war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide committed during the Yugoslav Wars and the Rwandan genocide, respectively. In summary, International criminal law and justice is a legal system that holds individuals and groups accountable for serious crimes committed on a global scale, such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and crimes of aggression. It is governed by a number of international treaties, including the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), and implemented through a variety of mechanisms, including international criminal tribunals, ad-hoc tribunals, and national courts. International criminal justice also includes reparations for victims and the restoration of dignity and respect for survivors, as well as the promotion of peaceful coexistence and reconciliation among communities.


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